I wanna be the Magnificent Stumble

Creator: Hiddow

Average Rating
8.3 / 10
Average Difficulty
76.5 / 100
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Tags:

Needle (12) Trigger (2) Original (1) Stumble-Like (1)

Screenshots

  • by geogeo222
  • by geogeo222
  • by geogeo222

26 Reviews:

shign
While I do understand why it's an important game and why it's still an inspiration for many other games, it clearly show its age and has its bunch of problems. To be short, the main problem is the balance of the jumps within saves, a lot of saves have their most difficult jump as the last one, many jumps felt really awkard to do especially a lot of one with water and all the ones where you have to go between two apples. Some parts are very satisfying to do but it's ruinned by all the annoying stuff and in the end there aren't a lot of saves where I didn't thought that it could have been better done.

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Rating: 7.3 73       Difficulty: 77 77
Mar 14, 2021
fubukiofficial
Rating based on normal mode.

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Tagged as: Needle
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Rating: 9.0 90       Difficulty: 78 78
Jan 6, 2021
YaBoiMarcAntony
Before I really dig into this, let me get one thing straight: normal (aka easy) mode is not a 70 in difficulty, so don't let the gamers fool you into believing otherwise. Maybe I'm just not used to this sort of needle, maybe I'm just bad, but it did not feel like a 70 to me at all.

Anyways...

I Wanna be the Magnificent Stumble is a classic needle game from the famous Hiddow, maker of Catharsis. It's such a classic needle game that you can find touches of Stumble in nearly every modern needle game you touch. Wonderful and egg were massively inspired by Hiddow's innovative design, Kale changed the face of the needle genre utilizing inspiration from Stumble. The facts are this: if you play a needle game post-2016, chances are you're playing something inspired by Stumble to some degree - whether it's through needle design or aesthetics.

Yes, that's one of the biggest boons of Magnificent Stumble, the utterly superb aesthetics. Each screen is striking in its presentation, combining often-messy spike layouts with minimalist block designs and sharp color choices. What's truly special about the visuals of the game, however, is that there was no play quality sacrificed to make this happen. Every jump feels special and like there was hours of thought poured into them so they would be as satisfying and well-balanced as possible. Even concerning the off-kilter spike layouts, they manage to meld excellently with the surrounding visuals so as to compliment them rather than clash.

Another aspect of Stumble that really, in my eyes, changed the game is its cohesion. This is something that Catharsis excelled at as well, but here I feel it turns the game into something truly special. The game is broken up into three sections: intro, left warp, and right warp. Though they flow excellently, what I want to really talk about concerns the left warp in particular. This is the longest section of the game and obviously the hardest, but it's where the game also truly shines. Often in needle games, you'll find yourself either just working your way to a warp or to a conspicuous exit on the left or right side of the screen. Thanks to these mostly-monotonous but well-established design choices, a lot of needle games can feel rather dreary and same-y. Magnificent Stumble opts for the latter design choice, but does something rather unique. Though you do traverse through screens in the same way, they are designed such that you'll find yourself working through screens you saw earlier on in the game. For example, one of the early saves has you drop into the next screen and do one final jump. Lower in this screen, however, is a whole other save that you won't be seeing for quite a while (or maybe you will, if you're a better player than me). This sort of cohesion makes the level feel like far more than just a series of well-designed needle screens. Instead, everything just felt like one big world that I was working through, like an adventurer in a foreign land.

Magnificent Stumble seems to take its roots in games like Fly the Far Away, concerning its design choices. In Fly the Far Away, every jump is important to some degree, whether its in its own right because it utilizes novel maneuvers and derives its difficulty from being peculiarly tight, or in relation to the screen at large - think of the plane at the end of the first screen, for example. This sort of thing is what Magnificent Stumble thrives on, though it's not quite as difficult - at least, on normal mode, anyways.

This, then, is the magnificence of Stumble. Every jump serves the grander scheme and always tests you in some way. Not once did I feel as if something was thrown in just to fill up the screen or to balance out a save. Everything is in its right place, and to remove any spike or cherry would be to damage the unity of Magnificent Stumble. Though it's not an astonishingly long game (there could be no more than twenty screens or so), I would not be surprised to find this took months of work and fine-tuning, if not years. At the same time, however, I would be similarly un-fazed to find that this was merely a weeks worth of work. This sort of design can only come through extreme effort or through divine inspiration, nothing less than that.

To recommend Magnificent Stumble would be to recommend Citizen Kane. The people who want to watch it will have already done so, and everything watched by the people who don't want to watch it has been in some way touched by Magnificent Stumble. In everything we play now, this game's spirit can be detected, and that is something that brings a smile to my face.

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Tagged as: Needle
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Rating: 9.0 90       Difficulty: 78 78
Dec 6, 2020
KIDDLE
rating based on the hard difficulty

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Rating: 6.5 65       Difficulty: 80 80
Jul 21, 2020
Avgustine
Excellent game, there are some jumps that were not very good but they are fune imo. Maybe later will do hard mode

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Tagged as: Needle Trigger
[0] Likes
Rating: 9.7 97       Difficulty: 75 75
Sep 10, 2019